At Natural Partners, We Love Our Pets!



Your dog keeps vigil faithfully by the door until you (finally!) arrive back home. Your kitty warms your bed on chilly nights. Your horse gently trots while your 2-year-old giggles. Your pets are family – and you want to give them the very best. So, can vitamin and mineral supplements bolster the health of your furry loved ones?
The answer is, yes.
Like us, animals are also exposed to stress and contaminants that compromise their health. So they too can benefit from vitamin and mineral supplements, antioxidants, and probiotics. Vitamin supplements formulated specifically for animals support the digestive, circulatory and cardiovascular systems, the immune system, and the building of healthy eyes, teeth, tissue and robust coats. (It’s a good idea to check with your pet’s health care provider and ask for advice regarding dosage and frequency.)
Just like humans, vitamin supplements support your pets can vitality, longevity and ability to ward off disease and infection. Consider:

  1. Like humans, animals can get their nutrients from food, if their diet is a fortified one, and if they’re hearty eaters. Dog food is highly processed, and not all brands are manufactured with quality ingredients that provide enough of the vitamins and minerals they need, including vitamins A, C, D and E, Vitamin B-12, iron, calcium and potassium. Always check dog food labels to ensure they include animal by-products.
  2. Animals with specific health issues may benefit from taking supplements to alleviate issues such as arthritic joints, gastrointestinal problems, or to counter the affects of aging on cognitive functions.
  3. Like humans, an animal’s outer coat reveals the condition of their internal health; so high protein omega -3 fatty acids support healthy skin, coat, joints, heart, and brain development.

There are also a few specific conditions that determine whether an animal can benefit from a vitamin supplement:
Inadequate exposure to sunlight can create a Vitamin D deficiency. If your pet stays indoors for prolonged periods of time, he or she may not get enough Vitamin D from the sun. It’s critical for dogs and cats to ingest enough Vitamin D to fortify their teeth and bones.
Cats and dogs produce less Vitamin C than other animals. Vitamin C relieves pain, builds collagen and empowers immunities that help stave off disease. Dogs and cats don’t produce the same levels as other animals, so a good supplement may fill in the gaps.
Like humans, animals – particularly companion animals – have to navigate stress. Don’t forget about the mind/body connection. When animals show signs of distress including trembling, pacing, panting, excessive scratching, whining or hiding (for dogs) or biting, inappropriate urinating, clinginess or listlessness (for cats), he or she may benefit from a calming supplement in addition to exercise and/or therapy.

Down, (the Hatch) Boy: Making it easier for Fido to swallow his supplements

It’s true, getting your beloved pet to swallow supplements might be as tricky as house-training a litter of slippery puppies. But there are tricks to easing the process along:

  • At Natty P., we offer supplements in a range of delivery options, including chews and liquids. (True confessions: Natty P. staff members are parents to some pretty pampered pets. We bear them in mind when offering products for yours!)
  • Make friends with your local compounding pharmacy. They also cater to the canine, feline and equine set. They often add flavor, such as chicken or beef, to make vitamin supplement more appealing to animals. (They can also deliver prescription medications in options such as powders, capsules and liquids!) Compounding pharmacies can be a pet owner’s best friend.
  • The old, “hide the pill” trick works, too. Nestle the pill into a morsel of special food your pet rarely gets, and let them have at it! It’s a little sneaky, we know. Don’t worry, they forgave you that one time you left them at Grandma’s, they’ll forgive this, too.

To make certain your pets get the very best nutrition, explore the many options of veterinary supplements we offer at Natural Partners. For us, it’s not a “ruff” job!


 

Sources:
http://www.thedogdaily.com/dish/diet/dogs_vitamins/index.html?target=vitamins#axzz2t3AtxBfk
http://blog.chron.com/fromunderthebridge/2013/02/do-indoor-pets-suffer-vitamin-d-deficiency/
http://www.goodpet.com/more-on-pet-vitamins